State anxiety and depression as factors modulating and influencing postoperative pain in dental implant surgery. A prospective clinical survey

Abstract
Objetives: To determine whether preoperative state anxiety and depression modulate or influence objective and subjective postoperative pain following dental implant insertion. Study Design: Prospective, clinical study with 7-day follow-up of a sample of 105 subjects who preoperatively completed the state anxiety questionnaire (STAI-E) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and postoperatively, at 2 and 7 days, recorded objective pain with the Semmes-Weinstein mechanical esthesiometer (SW test) and subjective pain with the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results: 85.6% and 81.5% of patients, respectively, recorded no signs of state anxiety or depression. The correlation between anxiety and depression for both maxillary bones was the lower ( P =0.02). The correlation between subjective and objective pain at 2 and 7 days, and the anatomic regions intervened, was statistically significant in the mandible at day 7 ( P <0.01), and highly significant ( P <0.001) for the other variables. The correlation between state anxiety and objective pain at day 7 was nearly statistically significant ( P =0.07). Conclusions: The correlation between state anxiety and depression, and objective and subjective pain at day 7 was not statistically significant. A strong correlation was found between objective and subjective pain in the immediate postoperative period.
Description
Bibliographic reference
Gómez de Diego, Rafael ; Cutando Soriano, Antonio ; Montero Martín, Javier ; Prados Frutos, Juan Carlos ; López-Valverde Centeno, Antonio. State anxiety and depression as factors modulating and influencing postoperative pain in dental implant surgery. A prospective clinical survey. En: Medicina oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal. Ed inglesa, 2014, Vol. 19, No. 6: 592-597