Myriocin-induced adaptive laboratory evolution of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals its potential to remodel lipid composition and heat tolerance
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Myriocin-induced adaptive laboratory evolution of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals its potential to remodel lipid composition and heat tolerance

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Myriocin-induced adaptive laboratory evolution of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals its potential to remodel lipid composition and heat tolerance

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dc.contributor.author Rández Gil, Francisca
dc.contributor.author Prieto Alamán, José Antonio
dc.contributor.author Rodríguez-Puchades, Alejandro
dc.contributor.author Casas, Josefina
dc.contributor.author Sentandreu, Vicente
dc.contributor.author Estruch Ros, Francisco
dc.date.accessioned 2021-03-24T15:40:30Z
dc.date.available 2021-03-24T15:40:30Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10550/78352
dc.description.abstract The modification of lipid composition allows cells to adjust membrane biophysical properties in response to changes in environmental temperature. Here, we use adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) in the presence of myriocin, a sphingolipid (SLs) biosynthesis inhibitor, to remodel the lipid profile of an industrial yeast strain (LH) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The approach enabled to obtain a heterogeneous population (LHev) of myriocin-tolerant evolved clones characterized by its growth capacity at high temperature. Myriocin exposure also caused tolerance to soraphen A, an inhibitor of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase Acc1, the rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid de novo production, supporting a change in lipid metabolism during ALE. In line with this, characterization of two randomly selected clones, LH03 and LH09, showed the presence of lipids with increased saturation degree and reduced acyl length. In addition, the clone LH03, which displays the greater improvement in fitness at 40°C, exhibited higher SL content as compared with the parental strain. Analysis of the LH03 and LH09 genomes revealed a loss of chromosomes affecting genes that have a role in fatty acid synthesis and elongation. The link between ploidy level and growth at high temperature was further supported by the analysis of a fully isogenic set of yeast strains with ploidy between 1N and 4N which showed that the loss of genome content provides heat tolerance. Consistent with this, a thermotolerant evolved population (LH40°) generated from the parental LH strain by heat-driven ALE exhibited a reduction in the chromosome copy number. Thus, our results identify myriocin-driven evolution as a powerful approach to investigate the mechanisms of acquired thermotolerance and to generate improved strains.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Microbial Biotechnology, 2020, vol. 13, num. 4, p. 1066-1081
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.source Rández-Gil, Francisca Prieto Alamán, José Antonio Rodríguez-Puchades, Alejandro Casas, Josefina Sentandreu, Vicente Estruch Ros, Francisco 2020 Myriocin-induced adaptive laboratory evolution of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals its potential to remodel lipid composition and heat tolerance Microbial Biotechnology 13 4 1066 1081
dc.subject Microbiologia
dc.subject Bioquímica
dc.title Myriocin-induced adaptive laboratory evolution of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals its potential to remodel lipid composition and heat tolerance
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated 2021-03-24T15:40:30Z
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1111/1751-7915.13555
dc.identifier.idgrec 138839

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