Reduced salivary oxytocin after an empathic induction task in intimate partner violence perpetrators: importance of socio-affective functions and its impact on prosocial behavior
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Reduced salivary oxytocin after an empathic induction task in intimate partner violence perpetrators: importance of socio-affective functions and its impact on prosocial behavior

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Reduced salivary oxytocin after an empathic induction task in intimate partner violence perpetrators: importance of socio-affective functions and its impact on prosocial behavior

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dc.contributor.author Comes Fayos, Javier
dc.contributor.author Blanco Gandía, María del Carmen
dc.contributor.author Rodriguez Moreno, Isabel
dc.contributor.author Rodríguez Arias, Marta
dc.contributor.author Lila Moreno, M. Soledad
dc.contributor.author Sarrate Costa, Carolina
dc.contributor.author Romero Martínez, Ángel
dc.contributor.author Moya Albiol, Luis
dc.date.accessioned 2022-10-14T07:52:54Z
dc.date.available 2022-10-14T07:52:54Z
dc.date.issued 2022
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10550/84172
dc.description.abstract Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) has been linked to difficulties in socio-affective functions. Nevertheless, the underlying psychobiological mechanisms that might be responsible for them remain unclear. Oxytocin (OXT) stands out as an important hormone that may favor the salience of social information, due to its relevance in empathy and prosocial behavior. Thus, the study of salivary OXT (sOXT) may provide further information about potential impairments in social cognition in IPV perpetrators. This study analyzed the effects of an empathic induction task, performed through negative emotion-eliciting videos, on endogenous sOXT levels, mood state, and emotional perception in 30 IPV perpetrators compared to 32 controls. Additionally, we explored their performance on prosocial behavior after the empathic induction task, using Hare's donation procedure. Lower sOXT levels were found in IPV perpetrators after the task compared to controls, along with a general decreasing tendency in their sOXT levels. Additionally, IPV perpetrators exhibited no change in their mood state and perceived others' emotions as more positive and less intense. Moreover, the mood state response and alexithymia traits, respectively, positively and negatively predicted the sOXT levels after the empathic induction task in the entire sample. Finally, we did not observe a lower appearance of prosocial behaviors in IPV perpetrators; however, higher sOXT levels after the empathic induction task were found in subjects who donated when considering the whole sample. In sum, IPV perpetrators exhibited differences in their sOXT levels when empathizing, compared to controls, with alexithymia and the emotional response potentially explaining the sOXT levels after the task. Furthermore, prosocial behavior was more related to these sOXT levels than to IPV. As our knowledge about the emotional processing of IPV perpetrators increases, we will be better able to develop and include coadjutant treatments in current psychotherapeutic programs, in order to focus on their emotional needs, which, in turn, would reduce the future risk of recidivism.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2022, vol. 137, p. 105644
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.source Comes Fayos, Javier Blanco Gandía, María del Carmen Rodriguez Moreno, Isabel Rodríguez Arias, Marta Lila Moreno, M. Soledad Sarrate Costa, Carolina Romero Martínez, Ángel Moya Albiol, Luis 2022 Reduced salivary oxytocin after an empathic induction task in intimate partner violence perpetrators: importance of socio-affective functions and its impact on prosocial behavior Psychoneuroendocrinology 137 105644
dc.subject Dones maltractades
dc.title Reduced salivary oxytocin after an empathic induction task in intimate partner violence perpetrators: importance of socio-affective functions and its impact on prosocial behavior
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated 2022-10-14T07:52:54Z
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2021.105644
dc.identifier.idgrec 152157

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