Natural enemies and biodiversity : the double-edged sword of trophic interactions
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Natural enemies and biodiversity : the double-edged sword of trophic interactions

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Natural enemies and biodiversity : the double-edged sword of trophic interactions

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Mestre, Alexandre; Holt, Robert D.
This document is a artículo publicadoDate2019
Natural enemies, that is, species that inflict harm on others while feeding on them, are fundamental drivers of biodiversity dynamics and represent a substantial portion of biodiversity as well. Along the life history of the Earth, natural enemies have been involved in probably some of the most productive mechanisms of biodiversity genesis; that is, adaptive radiation mediated by enemy-victim coevolutionary processes. At ecological timescales, natural enemies are a fundamental piece of food webs and can contribute to biodiversity preservation by promoting stability and coexistence at lower trophic levels through top-down regulation mechanisms. However, natural enemies often produce dramatic losses of biodiversity, especially when humans are involved.

    Mestre, Alexandre ; Holt, Robert D.. Natural enemies and biodiversity : the double-edged sword of trophic interactions. En: Mètode Science Studies Journal: Annual Review, 9 2019: 90-99

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