Telemonitoring in chronic pain management using smartphone apps: a randomized controlled trial comparing usual assessment against app-based monitoring with and without clinical alarms
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Telemonitoring in chronic pain management using smartphone apps: a randomized controlled trial comparing usual assessment against app-based monitoring with and without clinical alarms

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Telemonitoring in chronic pain management using smartphone apps: a randomized controlled trial comparing usual assessment against app-based monitoring with and without clinical alarms

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dc.contributor.author Suso Ribera, Carlos
dc.contributor.author Castilla López, Diana Virginia
dc.contributor.author Zaragozá Álvarez, Irene
dc.contributor.author Mesas Idáñez, Ángela
dc.contributor.author Server Salvà, Anna
dc.contributor.author Medel Rebollo, Francisco Javier
dc.contributor.author García Palacios, Azucena
dc.date.accessioned 2021-02-12T11:25:59Z
dc.date.available 2021-02-12T11:25:59Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10550/77743
dc.description.abstract Abstract: Background. The usefulness of mHealth in helping to target face-to-face interventions for chronic pain more effectively remains unclear. In the present study, we aim to test whether the Pain Monitor mobile phone application (app) is well accepted by clinicians, and can help improve existent medical treatments for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Regarding this last goal, we compared three treatment conditions, namely usual treatment, usual treatment with an app without alarms and usual treatment with an app with alarms. All treatments lasted one month. The three treatments were compared for all outcomes, i.e., pain severity and interference, fatigue, depressed mood, anxiety and anger. Methods. In this randomized controlled trial, the usual monitoring method (i.e., onsite; n = 44) was compared with daily ecological momentary assessment using the Pain Monitor app¿both with (n = 43) and without alarms (n = 45). Alarms were sent to the clinicians in the presence of pre-established undesired clinical events and could be used to make treatment adjustments throughout the one-month study. Results. With the exception of anger, clinically significant changes (CSC; 30% improvement) were greater in the app + alarm condition across outcomes (e.g., 43.6% of patients experienced a CSC in depressed mood in the app + alarm condition, which occurred in less than 29% of patients in the other groups). The clinicians were willing to use the app, especially the version with alarms. Conclusions. The use of apps may have some benefits in individual health care, especially when using alarms to tailor treatments.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof International Journal Of Environmental Research And Public Health, 2020, vol. 17, num. 18, p. 6568
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.source Suso Ribera, Carlos Castilla López, Diana Virginia Zaragozá Álvarez, Irene Mesas Idáñez, Ángela Server Salvà, Anna Medel Rebollo, Francisco Javier García Palacios, Azucena 2020 Telemonitoring in chronic pain management using smartphone apps: a randomized controlled trial comparing usual assessment against app-based monitoring with and without clinical alarms International Journal Of Environmental Research And Public Health 17 18 6568
dc.subject Salut mental
dc.title Telemonitoring in chronic pain management using smartphone apps: a randomized controlled trial comparing usual assessment against app-based monitoring with and without clinical alarms
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated 2021-02-12T11:25:59Z
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186568
dc.identifier.idgrec 143293

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