In the Beginning Was Silence: Brian Friel's Revisitation of the Artist
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In the Beginning Was Silence: Brian Friel's Revisitation of the Artist

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In the Beginning Was Silence: Brian Friel's Revisitation of the Artist

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dc.contributor.author Gaviña Costero, María
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-27T10:39:09Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-27T10:39:09Z
dc.date.issued 2017 es_ES
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10550/75369
dc.description.abstract When writing his 1997 play Give Me Your Answer, Do!, Brian Friel made an “exciting discovery”: Harpocrates, the God of Silence. For a writer who had been so much at pains to show on stage the inability of words to communicate the innermost feelings, this infant god was readily embraced as the perfect symbol with which to begin and end, as in the Ancient Rome, this transcendent performance. By placing the character of Bridget, an inarticulate autistic girl, at the beginning and at the ending of Give Me Your Answer, Do!, Friel counterbalances the “sound and the fury” that pervades modern life as reflected in the three couples of the play, while, at the same time, this reminds the audience of the sacred nature of drama, a ritual which puts the spectators in contact with the mysterious. However, this play is also important because of its autobiographical hue: we find the playwright fighting with his ghosts in front of the audience, splitting his persona into two characters, Tom and Garret, who develop on stage his fears and preoccupations at the time, including his recent meditations on Wittgenstein’s philosophy and the inexpressible. Give Me Your Answer, Do! is Friel’s last original play written in the 20th century, the closure of a very personal cycle in which the author unveils himself using his own vital experiences as a direct source of inspiration. es_ES
dc.language.iso en es_ES
dc.source Costero Gaviña, María. "In the Beginning Was Silence: Brian Friel's Revisitation of the Artist." Ireland and dysfunction: critical explorations in literature and film. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017. es_ES
dc.subject brian friel es_ES
dc.subject drama es_ES
dc.subject the artist es_ES
dc.subject give me your answer es_ES
dc.subject do! es_ES
dc.title In the Beginning Was Silence: Brian Friel's Revisitation of the Artist es_ES
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/bookPart es_ES
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::CIENCIAS DE LAS ARTES Y LAS LETRAS es_ES
dc.description.abstractenglish When writing his 1997 play Give Me Your Answer, Do!, Brian Friel made an “exciting discovery”: Harpocrates, the God of Silence. For a writer who had been so much at pains to show on stage the inability of words to communicate the innermost feelings, this infant god was readily embraced as the perfect symbol with which to begin and end, as in the Ancient Rome, this transcendent performance. By placing the character of Bridget, an inarticulate autistic girl, at the beginning and at the ending of Give Me Your Answer, Do!, Friel counterbalances the “sound and the fury” that pervades modern life as reflected in the three couples of the play, while, at the same time, this reminds the audience of the sacred nature of drama, a ritual which puts the spectators in contact with the mysterious. However, this play is also important because of its autobiographical hue: we find the playwright fighting with his ghosts in front of the audience, splitting his persona into two characters, Tom and Garret, who develop on stage his fears and preoccupations at the time, including his recent meditations on Wittgenstein’s philosophy and the inexpressible. Give Me Your Answer, Do! is Friel’s last original play written in the 20th century, the closure of a very personal cycle in which the author unveils himself using his own vital experiences as a direct source of inspiration. es_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec 072547 es_ES

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