Determination of pesticide residues in honey bees, pollen and beeswax: assessing pesticide hazard in spanish apiaries
NAGIOS: RODERIC FUNCIONANDO

Determination of pesticide residues in honey bees, pollen and beeswax: assessing pesticide hazard in spanish apiaries

DSpace Repository

Determination of pesticide residues in honey bees, pollen and beeswax: assessing pesticide hazard in spanish apiaries

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Picó García, Yolanda
dc.contributor.advisor Calatayud Tortosa, Fernando
dc.contributor.author Calatayud Vernich, Pau
dc.contributor.other Facultat de Química es_ES
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-18T09:12:58Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-19T05:45:08Z
dc.date.issued 2020 es_ES
dc.date.submitted 05-02-2020 es_ES
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10550/72645
dc.description.abstract Pollinator decline is an emerging worldwide problem with serious repercussions on agriculture and environment. Around one third of human food relies on insect pollination, and most of the flowering plants need pollinators to survive. Honey bee is the main pollinator in environments where anthropogenic pressure has reduced the number of native pollinators, like urban, rural and agricultural areas. The main cause of beekeeping crisis is parasite Varroa destructor and secondary infections associated with the mite. Pesticide contamination and nutritional deficiencies, combined with the parasite, can act synergistically and reduce survival of bee colonies. Honey bees patrol extensive areas when foraging for nectar and pollen. These foraging flights expose them to compounds applied to crops like insecticides, fungicides, nematicides and herbicides through different routes. They are also in contact with pesticides applied inside the hive against varroa mite by beekeepers. As a result, honey bees are exposed to cocktails of pesticides inside and outside their colonies. Multiresidue methods for the screening, identification and quantitation of pesticides require a high sensitivity and reliability. The LC-MS/MS is a rugged technique that can cover the majority of the challenges involved in that task. Prior to the determination of the pesticides, it is necessary an efficient extraction procedure as comprehensive as the equipment used in the identification. The QuEChERS procedure followed by HPLC-MS/MS provided appropriate results in terms of accuracy, precision, sensitivity and quickness, and therefore was a suitable method for the determination of the selected pesticides in honey bees, pollen and beeswax. Miticides used in beekeeping were the most frequently detected pesticides in beeswax, pollen and live bees, whereas insecticides were the most frequent compounds found in dead honey bees. Beeswax is the most contaminated hive compartment regarding levels of pesticides detected, whereas pollen revealed the highest number of different pesticide residues detected in the samples. Live honey bees were remarkably less contaminated in both quantities and number of pesticides detected. Pesticide poisoning episodes took place only in apiaries located near agricultural settings, and dead honey bees revealed high levels of chlorpyrifos, dimethoate and imidacloprid insecticides, used in the surrounding crops. Beeswax was the beekeeping matrix with the highest pesticide hazard to honey bees and acrinathrin was the most important contributor to the HQ scores. The pesticide hazard of pollen was considered relevant for bees, and the main contributors to HQ scores were acrinathrin and chlorpyrifos. Pesticide hazard in live bees was considered low. The results obtained showed the widespread occurrence of pesticides used in plant protection in pollen and dead bees samples, pointing out that the reliance on pesticides of modern agriculture should be reconsidered. es_ES
dc.format.extent 243 p. es_ES
dc.language.iso en es_ES
dc.subject pesticides es_ES
dc.subject honey bees es_ES
dc.subject beeswax es_ES
dc.subject pollen es_ES
dc.subject pesticide hazard es_ES
dc.subject LC-MS/MS es_ES
dc.subject QUECHERS es_ES
dc.subject apiaries es_ES
dc.title Determination of pesticide residues in honey bees, pollen and beeswax: assessing pesticide hazard in spanish apiaries es_ES
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis es_ES
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA Y DEL ESPACIO es_ES
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::QUÍMICA es_ES
dc.description.abstractenglish Pollinator decline is an emerging worldwide problem with serious repercussions on agriculture and environment. Around one third of human food relies on insect pollination, and most of the flowering plants need pollinators to survive. Honey bee is the main pollinator in environments where anthropogenic pressure has reduced the number of native pollinators, like urban, rural and agricultural areas. The main cause of beekeeping crisis is parasite Varroa destructor and secondary infections associated with the mite. Pesticide contamination and nutritional deficiencies, combined with the parasite, can act synergistically and reduce survival of bee colonies. Honey bees patrol extensive areas when foraging for nectar and pollen. These foraging flights expose them to compounds applied to crops like insecticides, fungicides, nematicides and herbicides through different routes. They are also in contact with pesticides applied inside the hive against varroa mite by beekeepers. As a result, honey bees are exposed to cocktails of pesticides inside and outside their colonies. Multiresidue methods for the screening, identification and quantitation of pesticides require a high sensitivity and reliability. The LC-MS/MS is a rugged technique that can cover the majority of the challenges involved in that task. Prior to the determination of the pesticides, it is necessary an efficient extraction procedure as comprehensive as the equipment used in the identification. The QuEChERS procedure followed by HPLC-MS/MS provided appropriate results in terms of accuracy, precision, sensitivity and quickness, and therefore was a suitable method for the determination of the selected pesticides in honey bees, pollen and beeswax. Miticides used in beekeeping were the most frequently detected pesticides in beeswax, pollen and live bees, whereas insecticides were the most frequent compounds found in dead honey bees. Beeswax is the most contaminated hive compartment regarding levels of pesticides detected, whereas pollen revealed the highest number of different pesticide residues detected in the samples. Live honey bees were remarkably less contaminated in both quantities and number of pesticides detected. Pesticide poisoning episodes took place only in apiaries located near agricultural settings, and dead honey bees revealed high levels of chlorpyrifos, dimethoate and imidacloprid insecticides, used in the surrounding crops. Beeswax was the beekeeping matrix with the highest pesticide hazard to honey bees and acrinathrin was the most important contributor to the HQ scores. The pesticide hazard of pollen was considered relevant for bees, and the main contributors to HQ scores were acrinathrin and chlorpyrifos. Pesticide hazard in live bees was considered low. The results obtained showed the widespread occurrence of pesticides used in plant protection in pollen and dead bees samples, pointing out that the reliance on pesticides of modern agriculture should be reconsidered. es_ES
dc.embargo.terms 0 days es_ES

View       (38.07Mb)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace

Advanced Search

Browse

Statistics