Handy Manny, or the Pragmatics in the Interaction of Cartoon Characters
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Handy Manny, or the Pragmatics in the Interaction of Cartoon Characters

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Handy Manny, or the Pragmatics in the Interaction of Cartoon Characters

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dc.contributor.author Gregori-Signes, Carmen
dc.contributor.author Alcantud Díaz, María
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-27T09:39:19Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-27T09:39:19Z
dc.date.issued 2012 es_ES
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10550/71581
dc.description.abstract This article presents the results obtained from the analysis of 20 episodes of the series with the intention of critically assessing the impact that it may have on teaching and learning English as a foreign language in a context where Spanish is the main language (L1). Handy Manny, similar to other series that follow this same format (e.g. Dora the explorer, Go Diego go) is broadcast predominantly in L1 (English in the U.S., and Spanish in Spain) with occasional inclusion of some expressions in L2. The terms from L2 are either single words or more complex lexical units naturally used by the fictional characters in the series. The purpose of this article is to explore when and how L2 is introduced, its function and the impact that its use may have in the process of learning English as a foreign language (EFL) for Spanish children under the age of nine, to whom the series is addressed. Handy Manny is marketed to parents and children as a programme that may help children learn and improve their English. However, to the best of our knowledge, no systematic account of what and how it may do so has been provided. Furthermore, the methodological approach adopted in this paper sets this study apart from others that focus on code-switching in the real world by entering the realm of fictional discourse. es_ES
dc.language.iso en es_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseries Teaching English as a Foreign Language: Proposals for the Language Classroom;
dc.source Gregori Signes, Carmen and Alcantud Díaz, María (2012). “Handy Manny, or the Pragmatics in the Interaction of Cartoon Characters. In García Pastor, Mª Dolores (Ed) Teaching English as a Foreign Language: Proposals for the Language Classroom”. Perifèric Edicions. 978-84-92435-47-0. Pp. 61-79. es_ES
dc.subject tv series es_ES
dc.subject code-switching es_ES
dc.subject tefl es_ES
dc.subject pragmatics es_ES
dc.title Handy Manny, or the Pragmatics in the Interaction of Cartoon Characters es_ES
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/bookPart es_ES
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::LINGÜÍSTICA es_ES
dc.description.abstractenglish This article presents the results obtained from the analysis of 20 episodes of the series with the intention of critically assessing the impact that it may have on teaching and learning English as a foreign language in a context where Spanish is the main language (L1). Handy Manny, similar to other series that follow this same format (e.g. Dora the explorer, Go Diego go) is broadcast predominantly in L1 (English in the U.S., and Spanish in Spain) with occasional inclusion of some expressions in L2. The terms from L2 are either single words or more complex lexical units naturally used by the fictional characters in the series. The purpose of this article is to explore when and how L2 is introduced, its function and the impact that its use may have in the process of learning English as a foreign language (EFL) for Spanish children under the age of nine, to whom the series is addressed. Handy Manny is marketed to parents and children as a programme that may help children learn and improve their English. However, to the best of our knowledge, no systematic account of what and how it may do so has been provided. Furthermore, the methodological approach adopted in this paper sets this study apart from others that focus on code-switching in the real world by entering the realm of fictional discourse. es_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec 038644 es_ES

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