Cattle as actors in a pastoral landscape. Gis analysis of an agropastoralist group
NAGIOS: RODERIC FUNCIONANDO

Cattle as actors in a pastoral landscape. Gis analysis of an agropastoralist group

DSpace Repository

Cattle as actors in a pastoral landscape. Gis analysis of an agropastoralist group

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Diez Castillo, Agustín
dc.contributor.author Salazar Bonet, Joan
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-31T11:33:39Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-31T11:33:39Z
dc.date.issued 2018 es_ES
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10550/71245
dc.description.abstract In the study of pastoral landscapes, ethnoarchaeology can incorporate first-hand information on material features and herding prac- tices and identify the active role of domestic animals in such practices. The Mursi are a present day transhumant agro-pastoralist group, which are specialized in the livestock herding of cattle (Bos indicus). This study examines evidence from this animal behaviour and its needs, which allows us to enrich a particular construction of a herding landscape in contemporary SW Ethiopia. Remote sens- ing techniques are employed to obtain landscape snapshots of the Mursi main pasture area, which are contrasted with fieldwork data. Moreover, recent improvement in digital terrain models permit us to test cattle desire lines with least-cost path (LCP) between settlements and resources, as well as distances from these settlements to various hazards. The context is characterized by high mobility; however, the Mursi settlements and their social reality consider fixed territorial strategic locations around different hydro- logical catchment areas and optimal pastures. Less detectable variables such as those related to diverse dangers also appear as key elements to understand this landscape. Animals, their short and long-distance movements, and their consequences on people help create an identity for the Mursi main pasture area. Cattle reveal itself as a decisive agent in the construction of both place and landscape, challenging the conception of animals as merely passive actors in domestication processes. es_ES
dc.language.iso en es_ES
dc.publisher European Association of Archaeologist es_ES
dc.source Salazar Boner, J.; Diez Castillo, A. (2018). Cattle as actors in a pastoral landscape. Gis analysis of an agropastoralist group. In 24th EAA Annual Meeting, Barcelona, 5-8 September, 2018 Reflecting futures, p. 390. Barcelona es_ES
dc.subject Bos indicus es_ES
dc.subject Geographical Information Systems es_ES
dc.subject Mursi es_ES
dc.subject Ethnoarchaeology es_ES
dc.title Cattle as actors in a pastoral landscape. Gis analysis of an agropastoralist group es_ES
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObject es_ES
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::HISTORIA::Ciencias auxiliares de la historia::Arqueología es_ES
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::GEOGRAFÍA::Geografía económica es_ES
dc.description.abstractenglish In the study of pastoral landscapes, ethnoarchaeology can incorporate first-hand information on material features and herding prac- tices and identify the active role of domestic animals in such practices. The Mursi are a present day transhumant agro-pastoralist group, which are specialized in the livestock herding of cattle (Bos indicus). This study examines evidence from this animal behaviour and its needs, which allows us to enrich a particular construction of a herding landscape in contemporary SW Ethiopia. Remote sens- ing techniques are employed to obtain landscape snapshots of the Mursi main pasture area, which are contrasted with fieldwork data. Moreover, recent improvement in digital terrain models permit us to test cattle desire lines with least-cost path (LCP) between settlements and resources, as well as distances from these settlements to various hazards. The context is characterized by high mobility; however, the Mursi settlements and their social reality consider fixed territorial strategic locations around different hydro- logical catchment areas and optimal pastures. Less detectable variables such as those related to diverse dangers also appear as key elements to understand this landscape. Animals, their short and long-distance movements, and their consequences on people help create an identity for the Mursi main pasture area. Cattle reveal itself as a decisive agent in the construction of both place and landscape, challenging the conception of animals as merely passive actors in domestication processes. es_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec 078636 es_ES

View       (457.3Kb)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace

Advanced Search

Browse

Statistics