Eudaimonia Wellbeing Beliefs and its implications for employees´ wellbeing, organizational performance, and helping others
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Eudaimonia Wellbeing Beliefs and its implications for employees´ wellbeing, organizational performance, and helping others

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Eudaimonia Wellbeing Beliefs and its implications for employees´ wellbeing, organizational performance, and helping others

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dc.contributor.advisor Martínez Tur, Vicente
dc.contributor.advisor Moliner Cantos, Carolina
dc.contributor.advisor Gracia Grau, Esther
dc.contributor.author Patras, Luminita
dc.contributor.other Departament de Psicologia Social es_ES
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-12T12:40:44Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-13T05:45:05Z
dc.date.issued 2018 es_ES
dc.date.submitted 15-02-2019 es_ES
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/68951
dc.description.abstract The aim of this doctoral thesis is to examine the impact of eudaimonia wellbeing beliefs – people conception of the nature and experience of wellbeing – on their wellbeing at workplace, on the organizational performance focused on helping others and on specific prosocial behaviours. Three empirical studies were conducted to this end, using different research designs and samples. Study 1 analyses the moderating role of the two dimensions of eudaimonia wellbeing beliefs (contribution-to-others and self-development) in the relationship between surface acting and exhaustion. We use a cross-sectional self-reported design and a sample of 817 front line employees working in 118 health care organizations providing services to people with intellectual disability. Results confirmed the hypotheses, showing that contribution-to-others strengthens the link from surface acting to exhaustion, whereas self-development weakens this relationship. Study 2 propose the mediation of service climate between employee's contribution-to-others wellbeing beliefs and organizational performance focused on the QoL of individuals with intellectual disability. We propose a multilevel mediation design with two informants: a sample of 885 employees, aggregated at organizational level and a sample of 809 family members as service users. The results supported the hypotheses, showing that when employees believe that their own wellbeing depends on helping others, service climate reported by employees is stimulated. Service climate in turn was associated with organizational performance focused on QoL of people with intellectual disability, assessed by family members. Study 3 examined the direct links from contribution-to-others and self-development to prosocial spending, as well as the interaction between these beliefs and autonomy in predicting the money given. It also tests the effect of a first exposure to a prosocial donation decision on subsequent prosocial spending. We propose an experimental design, using a sample of 200 participants. Results confirmed the existence of a positive significant relationship between contribution-to-others beliefs and prosocial spending, and a significant role of exposure, anchoring, autonomy in predicting the money spent to help vulnerable people. It also shows a significant interaction between autonomy and self-development well-being beliefs, such that autonomy strengthens the link from self-development beliefs to prosocial spending. In general, this doctoral thesis widens the understanding of eudaimonia wellbeing beliefs and their implications on experience wellbeing and helping others in need, both at organizational level, by enhancing the quality of life of service users, and as a citizen by donating to non-profit associations. It also offers a richer portrait of wellbeing, organizational performance and prosocial behavior by integrating different literatures and by considering cross-level, multi-level and experimental approaches. es_ES
dc.format.extent 172 p. es_ES
dc.language.iso en es_ES
dc.subject eudaimonia es_ES
dc.subject wellbeing beliefs es_ES
dc.subject wellbeing at workplace es_ES
dc.subject organizational performance es_ES
dc.subject prosocial behaviour es_ES
dc.title Eudaimonia Wellbeing Beliefs and its implications for employees´ wellbeing, organizational performance, and helping others es_ES
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis es_ES
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::PSICOLOGÍA es_ES
dc.description.abstractenglish The aim of this doctoral thesis is to examine the impact of eudaimonia wellbeing beliefs – people conception of the nature and experience of wellbeing – on their wellbeing at workplace, on the organizational performance focused on helping others and on specific prosocial behaviours. Three empirical studies were conducted to this end, using different research designs and samples. Study 1 analyses the moderating role of the two dimensions of eudaimonia wellbeing beliefs (contribution-to-others and self-development) in the relationship between surface acting and exhaustion. We use a cross-sectional self-reported design and a sample of 817 front line employees working in 118 health care organizations providing services to people with intellectual disability. Results confirmed the hypotheses, showing that contribution-to-others strengthens the link from surface acting to exhaustion, whereas self-development weakens this relationship. Study 2 propose the mediation of service climate between employee's contribution-to-others wellbeing beliefs and organizational performance focused on the QoL of individuals with intellectual disability. We propose a multilevel mediation design with two informants: a sample of 885 employees, aggregated at organizational level and a sample of 809 family members as service users. The results supported the hypotheses, showing that when employees believe that their own wellbeing depends on helping others, service climate reported by employees is stimulated. Service climate in turn was associated with organizational performance focused on QoL of people with intellectual disability, assessed by family members. Study 3 examined the direct links from contribution-to-others and self-development to prosocial spending, as well as the interaction between these beliefs and autonomy in predicting the money given. It also tests the effect of a first exposure to a prosocial donation decision on subsequent prosocial spending. We propose an experimental design, using a sample of 200 participants. Results confirmed the existence of a positive significant relationship between contribution-to-others beliefs and prosocial spending, and a significant role of exposure, anchoring, autonomy in predicting the money spent to help vulnerable people. It also shows a significant interaction between autonomy and self-development well-being beliefs, such that autonomy strengthens the link from self-development beliefs to prosocial spending. In general, this doctoral thesis widens the understanding of eudaimonia wellbeing beliefs and their implications on experience wellbeing and helping others in need, both at organizational level, by enhancing the quality of life of service users, and as a citizen by donating to non-profit associations. It also offers a richer portrait of wellbeing, organizational performance and prosocial behavior by integrating different literatures and by considering cross-level, multi-level and experimental approaches. es_ES
dc.embargo.terms 0 days es_ES

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