Differential preservation of endogenous human and microbial DNA in dental calculus and dentin
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Differential preservation of endogenous human and microbial DNA in dental calculus and dentin

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Differential preservation of endogenous human and microbial DNA in dental calculus and dentin

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dc.contributor.author Mann, Allison E.
dc.contributor.author Sabin, Susanna
dc.contributor.author Ziesemer, Kirsten
dc.contributor.author Vagene, Åshild J.
dc.contributor.author Schroeder, Hannes
dc.contributor.author Ozga, Andrew T.
dc.contributor.author Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan
dc.contributor.author Hofman, Courtney A.
dc.contributor.author Fellows Yates, James A.
dc.contributor.author Salazar García, Domingo Carlos
dc.contributor.author Frohlich, Bruno
dc.contributor.author Aldenderfer, Mark
dc.contributor.author Hoogland, Menno
dc.contributor.author Read, Christopher
dc.contributor.author Milner, George R.
dc.contributor.author Stone, Anne C.
dc.contributor.author Lewis, Cecil M.
dc.contributor.author Krause, Johannes
dc.contributor.author Hofman, Corinne
dc.contributor.author Bos, Kirsten I.
dc.contributor.author Wartinner, Christina
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-10T11:20:05Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-10T11:20:05Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/66948
dc.description.abstract Dental calculus (calcified dental plaque) is prevalent in archaeological skeletal collections and is a rich source of oral microbiome and host-derived ancient biomolecules. Recently, it has been proposed that dental calculus may provide a more robust environment for DNA preservation than other skeletal remains, but this has not been systematically tested. In this study, shotgun-sequenced data from paired dental calculus and dentin samples from 48 globally distributed individuals are compared using a metagenomic approach. Overall, we find DNA from dental calculus is consistently more abundant and less contaminated than DNA from dentin. The majority of DNA in dental calculus is microbial and originates from the oral microbiome; however, a small but consistent proportion of DNA (mean 0.08 ± 0.08%, range 0.007-0.47%) derives from the host genome. Host DNA content within dentin is variable (mean 13.70 ± 18.62%, range 0.003-70.14%), and for a subset of dentin samples (15.21%), oral bacteria contribute > 20% of total DNA. Human DNA in dental calculus is highly fragmented, and is consistently shorter than both microbial DNA in dental calculus and human DNA in paired dentin samples. Finally, we find that microbial DNA fragmentation patterns are associated with guanine cytosine (GC) content, but not aspects of cellular structure.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Scientific Reports, 2018, vol. 8, p. 1-15
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.source Mann, Allison E. Sabin, Susanna Ziesemer, Kirsten Vagene, Åshild J. Schroeder, Hannes Ozga, Andrew T. Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan Hofman, Courtney A. Fellows Yates, James A. Salazar García, Domingo Carlos Frohlich, Bruno Aldenderfer, Mark Hoogland, Menno Read, Christopher Milner, George R. Stone, Anne C. Lewis, Cecil M. Krause, Johannes Hofman, Corinne Bos, Kirsten I. Wartinner, Christina 2018 Differential preservation of endogenous human and microbial DNA in dental calculus and dentin Scientific Reports 8 1 15
dc.subject Cromosomes humans
dc.title Differential preservation of endogenous human and microbial DNA in dental calculus and dentin
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated 2018-07-10T11:20:06Z
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-28091-9
dc.identifier.idgrec 126447

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