Are socio-demographic factors associated to burnout syndrome in police officers? A correlational meta-analysis
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Are socio-demographic factors associated to burnout syndrome in police officers? A correlational meta-analysis

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Are socio-demographic factors associated to burnout syndrome in police officers? A correlational meta-analysis

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dc.contributor.author Aguayo, Raimundo
dc.contributor.author Vargas Pecino, Cristina
dc.contributor.author Cañadas, Gustavo Raúl
dc.contributor.author de la Fuente, Emilia I.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-18T19:06:58Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-18T19:06:58Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/64045
dc.description.abstract Abstract Burnout syndrome is considered a long term stress reaction which is seen primarily among professionals who work face-to-face with other people. Socio-demographic characteristics have been suggested as risk factors in the development of burnout, although empirical studies have yield contradictory results. The objective of the present study is to conduct a meta-analytic review of four socio-demographic factors (age, sex, marital status, and number of children) that may be correlated to burnout in police officers. These professionals have been considered a high-risk occupational group to suffer burnout due to specific characteristics of their job. We collected 43 empirical studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 23 on age, 32 on sex, 9 on marital status, and 4 on number of children. The bivariate correlation coefficient was used as the effect size measure. The results show that all the average effect were small, and the majority of them were not statistically significant. We can conclude that sex and age are factors to discard in the development of the burnout syndrome in police officers. We found that many studies did not report enough statistical information to estimate effect sizes. This systematic lack of information is likely to contribute finding contradictory results.Burnout syndrome is considered a long term stress reaction which is seen primarily among professionals who work face-to-face with other people. Socio-demographic characteristics have been suggested as risk factors in the development of burnout, although empirical studies have yield contradictory results. The objective of the present study is to conduct a meta-analytic review of four socio-demographic factors (age, sex, marital status, and number of children) that may be correlated to burnout in police officers. These professionals have been considered a high-risk occupational group to suffer burnout due to specific characteristics of their job. We collected 43 empirical studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 23 on age, 32 on sex, 9 on marital status, and 4 on number of children. The bivariate correlation coefficient was used as the effect size measure. The results show that all the average effect were small, and the majority of them were not statistically significant. We can conclude that sex and age are factors to discard in the development of the burnout syndrome in police officers. We found that many studies did not report enough statistical information to estimate effect sizes. This systematic lack of information is likely to contribute finding contradictory results.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Anales de Psicologia, 2017, vol. 33, num. 2, p. 383-392
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.source Aguayo, Raimundo Vargas Pecino, Cristina Cañadas, Gustavo Raúl de la Fuente, Emilia I. 2017 Are socio-demographic factors associated to burnout syndrome in police officers? A correlational meta-analysis Anales de Psicologia 33 2 383 392
dc.subject Estrès laboral
dc.subject Psicologia
dc.title Are socio-demographic factors associated to burnout syndrome in police officers? A correlational meta-analysis
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated 2018-01-18T19:06:58Z
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.33.2.260391
dc.identifier.idgrec 122876

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