From mammals back to birds: host-switch of the acanthocephalan Corynosoma australe from pinnipeds to the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus.
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From mammals back to birds: host-switch of the acanthocephalan Corynosoma australe from pinnipeds to the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus.

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From mammals back to birds: host-switch of the acanthocephalan Corynosoma australe from pinnipeds to the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus.

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dc.contributor.author Hernández Orts, Jesús Servando
dc.contributor.author Brandão, Marta
dc.contributor.author Georgieva, Simona
dc.contributor.author Raga Esteve, Juan Antonio
dc.contributor.author Crespo, Enrique Alberto
dc.contributor.author Luque, José Luís
dc.contributor.author Aznar Avedaño, Francisco Javier
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-15T12:05:37Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-15T12:05:37Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/63916
dc.description.abstract Trophically-transmitted parasites are regularly exposed to potential new hosts through food web interactions. Successful colonization, or switching, to novel hosts, occur readily when 'donor' and 'target' hosts are phylogenetically related, whereas switching between distantly related hosts is rare and may result from stochastic factors (i.e. rare favourable mutations). This study investigates a host-switching event between a marine acanthocephalan specific to pinnipeds that is apparently able to reproduce in Magellanic penguins Spheniscus magellanicus from Brazil. Detailed analysis of morphological and morphometrical data from acanthocephalans from penguins indicates that they belong to Corynosoma australe Johnston, 1937. Partial fragments of the 28S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 genes were amplified from isolates from penguins and two pinniped species (i.e. South American sea lion Otaria flavescens and South American fur seal Arctocephalus australis) to confirm this identification. Infection parameters clearly differ between penguins and the two pinniped species, which were significantly lower in S. magellanicus. The sex ratio of C. australe also differed between penguins and pinnipeds; in S. magellanicus was strongly biased against males, while in pinnipeds it was close to 1:1. Females of C. australe from O. flavescens were smaller than those from S. magellanicus and A. australis. However, fecundity (i.e. the proportion of fully developed eggs) was lower and more variable in females collected from S. magellanicus. At first glance, the occurrence of reproductive individuals of C. australe in Magellanic penguins could be interpreted as an adaptive colonization of a novel avian host through favourable mutations. However, it could also be considered, perhaps more likely, as an example of ecological fitting through the use of a plesimorphic (host) resource, since the ancestors of Corynosoma infected aquatic birds.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Plos One, 2017, vol. 12, num. 10, p. e0183809
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.source Hernández Orts, Jesús Servando Brandão, Marta Georgieva, Simona Raga Esteve, Juan Antonio Crespo, Enrique Alberto Luque, José Luís Aznar Avedaño, Francisco Javier 2017 From mammals back to birds: host-switch of the acanthocephalan Corynosoma australe from pinnipeds to the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus. Plos One 12 10 e0183809
dc.subject Cadenes alimentàries (Ecologia)
dc.subject Ecologia animal
dc.subject Zoologia
dc.title From mammals back to birds: host-switch of the acanthocephalan Corynosoma australe from pinnipeds to the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus.
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated 2018-01-15T12:05:37Z
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183809
dc.identifier.idgrec 122554

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