The switch from conventional to atypical antipsychotic treatment should not be based exclusively on the presence of cognitive deficits. A pilot study in individuals with schizophrenia
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The switch from conventional to atypical antipsychotic treatment should not be based exclusively on the presence of cognitive deficits. A pilot study in individuals with schizophrenia

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The switch from conventional to atypical antipsychotic treatment should not be based exclusively on the presence of cognitive deficits. A pilot study in individuals with schizophrenia

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dc.contributor.author Selva Vera, Gabriel es_ES
dc.contributor.author Balanzá Martínez, Vicent es_ES
dc.contributor.author Salazar Fraile, José María es_ES
dc.contributor.author Sánchez-Moreno, José es_ES
dc.contributor.author Martinez-Aran, Anabel es_ES
dc.contributor.author Correa, Patricia es_ES
dc.contributor.author Vieta, Eduard es_ES
dc.contributor.author Tabarés Seisdedos, Rafael es_ES
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-29T10:34:12Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-29T10:34:12Z
dc.date.issued 2010 es_ES
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/44816
dc.description.abstract BackgroundAtypical antipsychotics provide better control of the negative and affective symptoms of schizophrenia when compared with conventional neuroleptics; nevertheless, their heightened ability to improve cognitive dysfunction remains a matter of debate. This study aimed to examine the changes in cognition associated with long-term antipsychotic treatment and to evaluate the effect of the type of antipsychotic (conventional versus novel antipsychotic drugs) on cognitive performance over time.MethodsIn this naturalistic study, we used a comprehensive neuropsychological battery of tests to assess a sample of schizophrenia patients taking either conventional (n = 13) or novel antipsychotics (n = 26) at baseline and at two years after.ResultsContinuous antipsychotic treatment regardless of class was associated with improvement on verbal fluency, executive functions, and visual and verbal memory. Patients taking atypical antipsychotics did not show greater cognitive enhancement over two years than patients taking conventional antipsychotics.ConclusionsAlthough long-term antipsychotic treatment slightly improved cognitive function, the switch from conventional to atypical antipsychotic treatment should not be based exclusively on the presence of these cognitive deficits. es_ES
dc.source BMC Psychiatry Vol. 10 pp. 47-47 es_ES
dc.title The switch from conventional to atypical antipsychotic treatment should not be based exclusively on the presence of cognitive deficits. A pilot study in individuals with schizophrenia es_ES
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article es_ES
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-244X-10-47 es_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec 081375 es_ES

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