Centennial olive trees as a reservoir of genetic diversity
NAGIOS: RODERIC FUNCIONANDO

Centennial olive trees as a reservoir of genetic diversity

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Centennial olive trees as a reservoir of genetic diversity

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dc.contributor.author Díez, Concepción M. es_ES
dc.contributor.author Trujillo, Isabel es_ES
dc.contributor.author Barrio Esparducer, Eladio es_ES
dc.contributor.author Belaj, Angjelina es_ES
dc.contributor.author Barranco, Diego es_ES
dc.contributor.author Rallo, Luis es_ES
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-22T09:51:17Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-22T09:51:17Z
dc.date.issued 2011 es_ES
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/44672
dc.description.abstract Background and AimsGenetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the oldest trees could be a powerful tool both for germplasm collection and for understanding the earliest origins of clonally propagated fruit crops. The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) is a suitable model to study the origin of cultivars due to its long lifespan, resulting in the existence of both centennial and millennial trees across the Mediterranean Basin.MethodsThe genetic identity and diversity as well as the phylogenetic relationships among the oldest wild and cultivated olives of southern Spain were evaluated by analysing simple sequence repeat markers. Samples from both the canopy and the roots of each tree were analysed to distinguish which trees were self-rooted and which were grafted. The ancient olives were also put into chronological order to infer the antiquity of traditional olive cultivars.Key ResultsOnly 9·6 % out of 104 a priori cultivated ancient genotypes matched current olive cultivars. The percentage of unidentified genotypes was higher among the oldest olives, which could be because they belong to ancient unknown cultivars or because of possible intra-cultivar variability. Comparing the observed patterns of genetic variation made it possible to distinguish which trees were grafted onto putative wild olives.ConclusionsThis study of ancient olives has been fruitful both for germplasm collection and for enlarging our knowledge about olive domestication. The findings suggest that grafting pre-existing wild olives with olive cultivars was linked to the beginnings of olive growing. Additionally, the low number of genotypes identified in current cultivars points out that the ancient olives from southern Spain constitute a priceless reservoir of genetic diversity. es_ES
dc.source Annals of Botany Vol. 108 Issue 5: pp. 797-807 es_ES
dc.subject Olea europaea es_ES
dc.subject wild olives es_ES
dc.subject traditional cultivars es_ES
dc.subject microsatellite markers es_ES
dc.subject intracultivar variability es_ES
dc.subject domestication es_ES
dc.subject in situ conservation es_ES
dc.title Centennial olive trees as a reservoir of genetic diversity es_ES
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article es_ES
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/aob/mcr194 es_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec 074392 es_ES

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