Justicia organizacional en el sector servicios: El impacto de “peer justice” sobre el desempeño de la organización, la calidad percibida por los clientes y el bienestar de los empleados
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Justicia organizacional en el sector servicios: El impacto de “peer justice” sobre el desempeño de la organización, la calidad percibida por los clientes y el bienestar de los empleados

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Justicia organizacional en el sector servicios: El impacto de “peer justice” sobre el desempeño de la organización, la calidad percibida por los clientes y el bienestar de los empleados

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dc.contributor.advisor Moliner Cantos, Carolina
dc.contributor.advisor Martínez Tur, Vicente
dc.contributor.advisor Cropanzano, Russell
dc.contributor.author Molina, Agustín
dc.contributor.other Departament de Psicologia Social es_ES
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-31T07:38:27Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-02T04:45:04Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.date.submitted 29-10-2014 es_ES
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/39513
dc.description.abstract The aim of this doctoral thesis is to examine the impact of peer justice—i.e., unit-level perceptions of the fairness with which coworkers generally treat one another—in service organizations. Five empirical studies were conducted to this end, using two samples from the health care industry, and controlling the effect of its counterpart, justice climate—i.e., unit-level perceptions of the fairness with which the unit is collectively treated by an authority figure. Sample 1 consisted of 79 supervisors, 532 employees, and 748 customers nested in 79 work units, whereas Sample 2 consisted of 692 employees nested in 111 work units. Study 1 tests the validity of peer justice and justice climate as second-order constructs. Study 2 tests a structural equation model in which peer justice and justice climate relate to unit-level performance, through the mediating role of service climate—a critical predictor of performance within service organizations. Study 3 tests a multilevel Justice-Quality model in which peer justice and justice climate relate to employees’ shared perceptions of service quality which, in turn, translate to customers’ perceptions of service quality and, finally, to customers’ quality of life. Study 4 tests the cross-level effect of peer justice on the core dimensions of burnout—emotional exhaustion and cynicism—, above and beyond the effect of justice climate. Study 5 tests the role of justice climate strength—i.e., degree of agreement among members of the same work unit on whether the unit has been treated fairly by the authority figures—as a moderator of the effect of justice climate on peer justice. Despite showing the importance of authority figures as sources of justice, the results of the five studies presented in this doctoral thesis indicate that this source is not sufficient to explain the effects of shared justice perceptions. Altogether, the results reported in this doctoral thesis provide evidence that support the positive impact of peer justice on service organizations. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. es_ES
dc.format.extent 396 p. es_ES
dc.language.iso es es_ES
dc.subject Organizaciones es_ES
dc.subject Justice es_ES
dc.subject Peer Justice Climate es_ES
dc.title Justicia organizacional en el sector servicios: El impacto de “peer justice” sobre el desempeño de la organización, la calidad percibida por los clientes y el bienestar de los empleados es_ES
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis es_ES
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::PSICOLOGÍA::Psicología industrial es_ES
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::PSICOLOGÍA::Psicología industrial es_ES
dc.description.abstractenglish The aim of this doctoral thesis is to examine the impact of peer justice—i.e., unit-level perceptions of the fairness with which coworkers generally treat one another—in service organizations. Five empirical studies were conducted to this end, using two samples from the health care industry, and controlling the effect of its counterpart, justice climate—i.e., unit-level perceptions of the fairness with which the unit is collectively treated by an authority figure. Sample 1 consisted of 79 supervisors, 532 employees, and 748 customers nested in 79 work units, whereas Sample 2 consisted of 692 employees nested in 111 work units. Study 1 tests the validity of peer justice and justice climate as second-order constructs. Study 2 tests a structural equation model in which peer justice and justice climate relate to unit-level performance, through the mediating role of service climate—a critical predictor of performance within service organizations. Study 3 tests a multilevel Justice-Quality model in which peer justice and justice climate relate to employees’ shared perceptions of service quality which, in turn, translate to customers’ perceptions of service quality and, finally, to customers’ quality of life. Study 4 tests the cross-level effect of peer justice on the core dimensions of burnout—emotional exhaustion and cynicism—, above and beyond the effect of justice climate. Study 5 tests the role of justice climate strength—i.e., degree of agreement among members of the same work unit on whether the unit has been treated fairly by the authority figures—as a moderator of the effect of justice climate on peer justice. Despite showing the importance of authority figures as sources of justice, the results of the five studies presented in this doctoral thesis indicate that this source is not sufficient to explain the effects of shared justice perceptions. Altogether, the results reported in this doctoral thesis provide evidence that support the positive impact of peer justice on service organizations. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. es_ES
dc.embargo.terms 1 year es_ES

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