Maternal post-natal tobacco use and current parental tobacco use is associated with higher body mass index in children and adolescents: an international cross-sectional study
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Maternal post-natal tobacco use and current parental tobacco use is associated with higher body mass index in children and adolescents: an international cross-sectional study

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Maternal post-natal tobacco use and current parental tobacco use is associated with higher body mass index in children and adolescents: an international cross-sectional study

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dc.contributor.author Braithwaite, Irene
dc.contributor.author Stewart, Alistair W.
dc.contributor.author Hancox, Robert J.
dc.contributor.author Beasley, Richard
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Rinki
dc.contributor.author Mitchell, Edwin A.
dc.contributor.author ISAAC Phase Three Study Group
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-27T13:08:13Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-27T13:08:13Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/54270
dc.description.abstract Background: We investigated whether maternal smoking in the first year of life or any current parental smoking is associated with childhood or adolescent body mass index (BMI). Methods: Secondary analysis of data from a multi-centre, multi-country, cross-sectional study (ISAAC Phase Three). Parents/guardians of children aged 6-7 years completed questionnaires about their children's current height and weight, whether their mother smoked in the first year of the child's life and current smoking habits of both parents. Adolescents aged 13-14 years completed questionnaires about their height, weight and current parental smoking habits. A general linear mixed model was used to determine the association between BMI and parental smoking. Results: 77,192 children (18 countries) and 194 727 adolescents (35 countries) were included. The BMI of children exposed to maternal smoking during their first year of life was 0.11 kg/m2 greater than those who were not (P = 0.0033). The BMI of children of currently smoking parents was greater than those with non-smoking parents(maternal smoking: +0.08 kg/m2 (P = 0.0131), paternal smoking: +0.10 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001)). The BMI of female adolescents exposed to maternal or paternal smoking was 0.23 kg/m2 and 0.09 kg/m2 greater respectively than those who were not exposed (P < 0.0001). The BMI of male adolescents was greater with maternal smoking exposure, but not paternal smoking (0.19 kg/m2, P < 0.0001 and 0.03 kg/m2, P = 0.14 respectively). Conclusion: Parental smoking is associated with higher BMI values in children and adolescents. Whether this is due to a direct effect of parental smoking or to confounding cannot be established from this observational study.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Bmc Pediatrics, 2015, num. 15, p. 222
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.source Braithwaite, Irene Stewart, Alistair W. Hancox, Robert J. Beasley, Richard Murphy, Rinki Mitchell, Edwin A. ISAAC Phase Three Study Group 2015 Maternal post-natal tobacco use and current parental tobacco use is associated with higher body mass index in children and adolescents: an international cross-sectional study Bmc Pediatrics 15 222
dc.subject tabac efectes fisiològics
dc.subject tabaquisme
dc.subject infants
dc.subject obesitat
dc.subject trastorns de la nutrició en els infants
dc.subject pares
dc.subject adolescents
dc.title Maternal post-natal tobacco use and current parental tobacco use is associated with higher body mass index in children and adolescents: an international cross-sectional study
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated 2016-06-27T13:08:13Z
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12887-015-0538-x
dc.identifier.idgrec 111039

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