The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients
NAGIOS: RODERIC FUNCIONANDO

The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients

DSpace Repository

The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Shugaa-Addin, Bassam es
dc.contributor.author Al-Shamiri, Hashem M. es
dc.contributor.author Al-Maweri, Sadeq A. es
dc.contributor.author Tarakji, Bassel es
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-26T09:33:03Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-26T09:33:03Z
dc.date.issued 2016 es
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/53792
dc.source Shugaa-Addin, Bassam ; Al-Shamiri, Hashem M. ; Al-Maweri, Sadeq A. ; Tarakji, Bassel. The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients. En: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry, 2016, Vol. 8, No. 2: 194-200 es
dc.subject Odontología es
dc.subject Ciencias de la salud es
dc.title The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients es
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion en
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::CIENCIAS MÉDICAS es
dc.description.abstractenglish Objectives: To explore the current literature of the survival of dental implants in irradiated head and neck cancer patients considering the role of implant location, bone augmentation, dose of radiation and timing of implant placement. Study Design: Pubmed search was conducted to identify articles published between January 2000 and December 2014 and presenting data of dental implant survival with radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Studies on animal subjects and craniofacial implants were excluded. Results: 18 articles out of 27 were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. 12 out of 18 studies reported favorable outcome of dental implants and radiotherapy with survival rates between 74.4% and 97%. Seven out of ten studies comparing the survival rates according to site of implant placement reported that implants were found to osseointegrate with greater success in the irradiated mandible than irradiated maxilla. 5 studies which compared implant survival in irradiated native bone versus irradiated grafted bone reported that irradiated grafted bone showed a significantly reduced dental implant survival rate in comparison to irradiated native bone. 6 out of 18studies in which radiation doses exceeded 70 Gy reported lower survival rates of dental implants in comparison to the studies in which radiation doses were ≤70Gy. Higher survival rates were reported in 2 studies in which implants placement was before radiotherapy in comparison to the remaining 16 studies in which implants placement was after radiotherapy. Conclusions: Dental implants may be affected by radiotherapy especially when they are placed in maxilla, in grafted bone, or after radiation, however, they remain a functional option for rehabilitation of head and cancer patients. More prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trails are still needed to draw more evidence based conclusions es

View       (413.7Kb)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace

Advanced Search

Browse

Statistics