Occurrence of whale barnacles in Nerja Cave (Málaga, southern Spain): Indirect evidence of whale consumption by humans in the Upper Magdalenian
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Occurrence of whale barnacles in Nerja Cave (Málaga, southern Spain): Indirect evidence of whale consumption by humans in the Upper Magdalenian

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Occurrence of whale barnacles in Nerja Cave (Málaga, southern Spain): Indirect evidence of whale consumption by humans in the Upper Magdalenian

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Álvarez Fernández, Esteban; Carriol, René-Pierre; Jordá Pardo, Jesús F.; Aura Tortosa, J. Emili Perfil; Avezuela Aristu, Bárbara; Carrión Marco, Yolanda Perfil; García Guinea, Javier; Morales Pérez, Juan Vicente Perfil; Badal, Ernestina Perfil; Maestro González, Adolfo; Pérez Jordà, Guillem; Pérez Ripoll, Manuel; Rodrigo García, María José; Scarff, James E.; Villalba Currás, María Paz; Wood, Rachel
This document is a artículoDate2013

Este documento está disponible también en : http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2013.01.014

Este documento está disponible también en : http://hdl.handle.net/10550/36217
A total of 167 plates of two whale barnacle species (Tubicinella majorLamarck, 1802 and Cetopirus complanatusMörch, 1853) have been found in the Upper Magdalenian layers of Nerja Cave, Mina Chamber (Maro, Málaga, southern Spain). This is the first occurrence of these species in a prehistoric site. Both species are specific to the southern right whale Eubalena australis, today endemic in the Southern Hemisphere. Because of Antarctic sea-ice expansion during the Last Glacial Period, these whales could have migrated to the Northern Hemisphere, and reached southern Spain. Whale barnacles indicate that maritime-oriented forager human groups found stranded whales on the coast and, because of the size and weight of the large bones, transported only certain pieces (skin, blubber and meat) to the caves where they were consumed.

    Álvarez Fernández, Esteban Carriol, René-Pierre Jordá Pardo, Jesús F. Aura Tortosa, J. Emili Avezuela, Bárbara Carrión Marco, Yolanda García Guinea, Javier Morales, Juan V. Badal, Ernestina Maestro González, Adolfo Pérez Jordà, Guillem Pérez Ripoll, Manuel Rodrigo, María J. Scarff, James E. Villalba, M. Paz Wood, Rachel 2013 Occurrence of whale barnacles in Nerja Cave (Málaga, southern Spain): Indirect evidence of whale consumption by humans in the Upper Magdalenian Quaternary International
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2013.01.014

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