Conventional radiofrequency treatment in five patients with trigeminal neuralgia
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Conventional radiofrequency treatment in five patients with trigeminal neuralgia

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Conventional radiofrequency treatment in five patients with trigeminal neuralgia

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dc.contributor.author Bovaira Forner, Maite es
dc.contributor.author Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel es
dc.contributor.author Peñarrocha Diago, María es
dc.contributor.author Calvo, Ana es
dc.date.accessioned 2014-05-28T12:44:51Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-28T12:44:51Z
dc.date.issued 2013 es
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10550/35566
dc.source Bovaira Forner, Maite ; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel ; Peñarrocha Diago, María ; Calvo, Ana. Conventional radiofrequency treatment in five patients with trigeminal neuralgia. En: Medicina oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal. Ed inglesa, 2013, Vol. 18, No. 1: 76-80 es
dc.subject Odontología es
dc.subject Ciencias de la salud es
dc.title Conventional radiofrequency treatment in five patients with trigeminal neuralgia es
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion en
dc.subject.unesco UNESCO::CIENCIAS MÉDICAS es
dc.description.abstractenglish Introduction: In trigeminal neuralgia, when drug treatment proves ineffective, other management options must be considered. In this context, conventional radiofrequency of Gasser's ganglion is a safe and effective alternative. Material and Methods: We describe 5 patients with long-evolving trigeminal neuralgia subjected to conventional radiofrequency according to the Sweet technique, with a follow-up of two years. Results: Pain relief was complete after two months in all cases. One patient suffered an unexpected episode of nausea, vomiting and foul odor sensation that subsided after three days of rest and drug treatment. Three patients described non-painful hypoesthesia in the region of the treated nerve branch that subsided within three months. The patients remained free of symptoms over long-term follow-up. In one case the same radiofrequency technique had to be repeated after 21 months because of the reappearance of symptoms in the same zone, followed by immediate pain relief. Conclusions: In our series of patients trigeminal neuralgia was not controlled by drug treatment, and conventional radiofrequency targeted to Gasser's ganglion proved very effective, with no major complications. es

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